The Natural City

Last night the University of Toronto Press launched The Natural City edited by Ingrid Leman Stefanovic and Stephen Bede Scharper. The launch took place in the very groovy member’s lounge at Toronto City Hall and was moderated by Dr. James Orbinski.

Rocktoberfest 2011

Come learn all about ‘Walls Without Mortar‘ this Fall.

Natural dry laid stone structures are ‘green,’ long lasting, beautiful & fun to build & educational to watch being built.

Dry Stone Walling Across Canada 

will once again be putting on this spectacular four-day annual

event on Thanksgiving Weekend near Bellfountain Ontario

 at Hart House Farm, Caledon, Ontario on the property of University of Toronto.

At this year’s ‘Rocktoberfest’

There will be An Open Air Celebration of this Ancient Craft.

Including – Displays, Craft Booths, Music, Plus You can watch Unique Walling Projects being built every day

and attend Evening Presentations and Lectures

Entrance to the Festival Property and most of the events are Free !

 Mariana Cook will discuss her latest book:

Stone Walls: Personal Boundries

Books will be available for sale!

For more information visit

www.dswac.ca

905 885 4298

Hart House Farm

15911 Creditview Rd.

Caledon Ontario

On Tap Launch September 15th

This Crazy Time: Living our Environmental Challenge

Event date: Monday, September 19, 2011, at 12:00 PM
Location: 7th Floor Graduate Student Lounge, 155 College Street

Global Health Office, Dalla Lana School of Public Health
&
Random House Canada

invite you to intend 

 a reading and discussion with author


Tzeporah Berman  on her book
This Crazy Time: Living our Environmental Challenge

Introductions and discussion moderated by
Donald Cole, Associate Professor and Interim Division Head, Global Health Division
Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto

Monday, September 19 at 12noon
7th Floor Graduate Student Lounge, 155 College Street
RSVP to  j.kopelow@utoronto.ca  

Summer is almost over. Now what?

The countdown has begun. There are 5 weeks until The Word on the Street.

Every year, just before September, we get very excited here at The U of T Bookstore. It’s ‘back to school’ and the store is busier than ever but it’s also the start of the fall book season. New and exciting books start coming in and there’s more to read then ever.  So where do you start? How about the line up at The Word on the Street?

Each year I eagerly anticipate the list of authors who will be attending The Word on the Street. It’s like Christmas in summer for me. Who will be the festival sweetheart this year? Who will attract line ups around the park? It’s hard to predict all this but you have to start somewhere so I choose the wacky and wonderful author Tony Burgess to read. Burgess’ last book, Pontypool Changes Everything was a Canadian zombie bestseller. It explored our obsessions with zombies and epidemics. It was made into both a motion picture and a radio play.

Burgess’ newest book, Idaho Winter is a bizarre story of a young boy who nobody likes because there is no reason to. He lives in filth and his parents hate him more than anyone else. But there is one person who does not hate Idaho and she is the lovely Madison Beach. We are introduced to the world of Idaho Winter by an intrusive narrator who asks us, the reader to extend our empathy for this hated boy. But how can we help this little boy who is hated by everyone except for an innocent little girl? Perhaps little Idaho will just have to help himself?

This book immediately caught my attention from the beautiful cover to the quirky opening Chapter. And once I started to learn more about Idaho and his bizarre world of hateful people, the more I couldn’t put this book down. I’ll have to admit I haven’t read Pontypool Changes Everything because I’ve heard so much about it and its corresponding movie that I feel like I already know the entire story. But after reading Idaho Winter I’m going to have to investigate this Tony Burgess a little more closely. I can’t wait to meet him at The Word on the Street and get my copy of his newest book signed!

The 2011 International and Canadian Shortlist for The Griffin Poetry Prize

Each year The Griffin Trust For Excellence In Poetry invites 7 finalists, three Canadian and four International, to read in Toronto at Koerner Hall at The Royal Conservatory of Music in the TELUS Centre for Performance and Learning. The 7 finalists will be awarded $10,000 for their participation in the shortlist readings on May 31st and the winners will be awarded $65,000 each on June 1, 2011.

 

International Shortlist:

Human Chain by Seamus Heaney

Adonis: Selected Poems translated by Khaled Mattawa from the Arabic written by Adonis

The Book of the Snow translated by Philip Mosley from the French written by Francois Jacqmin

Heavenly Questions by Gjertrud Schnackenberg

Canadian Shortlist:

Ossuaries by Dionne Brand

The Irrationalist by Suzanne Buffam

Lookout by John Steffler

The judges on the panel include none other than Tim Lilburn (Canada), Colm Toibin (Ireland) and Chase Twichel (USA). But in order to form my own opinions and hear back from the people I will be reading and reviewing each nominee. So stay tuned for some poetry reviews and please don’t be shy in sharing your opinions as well.

The 2011 Donald Creighton Lecture

David Hackett Fischer (AB Princeton, PhD Johns Hopkins) is a University Professor and Earl Warren Professor of History at Brandeis University. He has won numerous teaching awards and served as a distinguished visitor at several institutions around the world. An influential historical interpreter and gifted narrator, his major works include the much acclaimed Albion’s Seed: Four British Folkways in America (1989, 2009) and the Pulitzer Prize winning Washington’s Crossing (2004).

Professor Fischer’s Donald Creighton Lecture grows from his latest book, Champlain’s Dream (2008, 2009), which has been enthusiastically received in the USA, Canada and Europe. The French translation, Le Reve de Champlain, is forthcoming from Boreal this spring.

Doors open at 3:30pm, Lecture begins at 4pm

George Ignatieff Theatre, Trinity College

15 Devonshire Place

First-come, first-served basis

Kindly RSVP: history.events@utoronto.ca